Confronting Old Testament Controversies – A Book Review

Confronting OT ControversiesFor anyone who considers themself to be a Christian, they have most likely encountered a verse, a passage, a story, or even a book of the Bible that has had them scratching their head, wondering whether or not it’s true or just how they should be interpreting it. For centuries, people have come to these passages from a variety of different viewpoints.

How do we approach the Bible? What do we do with the sections that seem fairly controversial to us? What happens when parts of it seem to be out of date or irrelevant? What happens when the dominant culture pulls away from what had become the societal norms conveyed in the pages of Scripture?

With his latest book, “Confronting Old Testament Controversies – Pressing Questions about Evolution, Sexuality, History, and Violence,” Tremper Longman addresses some of the questions most frequently asked about the Bible and all that is found within its pages.

To start, Longman states in his introduction that, “this book is written for the church and not the broader culture.” This is a helpful statement knowing that he would be writing with a very different approach had his book been targeted at those who did not necessarily subscribe to the Bible’s teachings.

Longman tells his readers what he will be addressing within the book. Creation and evolution. Historicity. Divine Violence. Sexuality.

Longman spends some necessary time addressing the notion of inerrancy.  He writes of interpretation and intended meaning of authors. Basically, he gives a high level overview of hermeneutics. He does a good job of giving this overview as he also addresses context and seeing Scripture through the eyes of those for whom it was originally intended.

God speaks, Longman writes, through nature and through the Bible. While those things are inerrant, our interpretations of both of those may not always be true.

From here, Longman goes on to dig into Genesis. He addresses various teachings that have occurred over the years on the first chapters of the Bible. How should we be interpreting it based upon other writings similar in style to it? Is there figurative language used that is trying to be read more literally than it was intended?

As he lays this all out, Longman writes that Genesis 1 is not giving the reader, “a blow-by-blow account of how God created everything but is using the standard workweek…as a literary device…” He reminds the reader that genre triggers reading strategy. So, we are in error to be reading poetry or analogy as history.

He compares the creation account found in the Bible to other creation accounts found in the ancient near East. He concludes the section saying that there is no reason, in his scholarly opinion, to think that what is found in the pages of Genesis gives a factual report of the specific process of creation. Considering evolution or other secondary causes, Longman suggests, does not undermine God’s role as the divine Creator. He goes on to address the fall of humanity, Adam and Eve, and other ramifications that his interpretation may reveal.

After creation and evolution, Longman addresses the historicity of various sections of the Bible. Did they really happen? If they didn’t happen, does that undermine the validity of Scripture? What do we do when Scripture makes reference to these elsewhere or when Jesus himself makes reference to them?

In this section, Longman, who considers himself a part of the evangelical camp, is critical of evangelicals saying that, “evangelicals have a tendency to treat the Bible as if it were all one genre.” While he addresses a story like Job and says that it did not actually happen historically, he also addresses the exodus and says that the historicity of that story is crucial to establishing a track record for the God of Israel.

Longman gets fairly technical, addressing some of the historic finds that have brought into question the validity and historicity of the Bible. His bottom line is that not all of the sections of the Bible need to be interpreted as having literally and historically taken place in order for the message that is conveyed to be true and important.

He then moves to the section on divine violence. As he enters into this section, he gives his reader the bottom line thesis saying that both the Old and New Testaments of the Bible give a consistent, coherent, and unified picture of God. He addresses the concern that many have had in trying to reconcile the wrath of God shown in the Old Testament with the love of God identified within the New Testament.

He does a good job of conveying his viewpoint as well as contrary viewpoints. He gives reasons for his difference and supports his argument. As he speaks of death, pain, suffering, and violence, Longman reminds his reader that death and suffering were not the purpose or goal of Jesus’ mission but instead that his mission was accomplished through death and suffering.

While there are certainly uncomfortable sections and events in the pages of the Bible which describe the wrath and violence of God, Longman says that we need to interpret God based on his revelation of himself in those pages rather than trying to soften the sections that make us uncomfortable or with which we disagree.

The final section of Longman’s book may very well be the most anticipated and controversial. It seems that the traditional Christian stance on sexuality has become outdated and flies in sharp contrast and opposition to where culture and society are today.

Longman addresses the controversy and argument that many have made regarding the publicness of sex. He writes, “Sex and marriage are public, social acts, not private acts, even if the sexual acts are done behind closed doors.” He also addresses gender and sexuality dysfunction, saying that everyone is sexually dysfunctional at some level.

While Longman addresses the standard laws that have been used in the argument against homosexuality, he also brings focus back to creation and speaks of God’s original intent for things. He reminds them that creation, as we are experiencing it, is not as God originally intended it to be. Therefore, we need to be cautious about not considering that as we look at everything.

He addresses the standard argument of the three types of laws found within the Old Testament: ceremonial, moral, and civil laws. He makes his case that ceremonial and even some civil laws may have been fulfilled but that there is no indication in the Bible that the moral laws that were originally given to the people of God were ever made null and void anywhere in Scripture.

He hits on arguments and questions that have been made by some who support an affirming lifestyle. He writes, “Our problem is that we, as modern Westerners, believe that love should allow us all as individuals to find our own personal happiness in the here and now. But personal happiness is not the greatest good in the Bible.” Ultimately, Longman lands on the traditional side of this argument.

Longman addresses each of these topics in its own chapter, making the chapters fairly long. Each chapter has discussion questions for use by the reader to spend time mulling over these various sections. Some sections get a little heady and he may lose some of his readers in these technical sections. Of course, I could imagine him simply suggesting that readers skip to the sections of which they are most interested.

I was so curious coming to this book as to where he would stand on these four important topics. As I read through the first section on creation and evolution, I was somewhat surprised at where he came down with his conclusion. Then, after reading the first three sections of the book, I was rather surprised to come to Longman’s section on sexuality and read his stance. I had expected, based on what I had encountered in those first three sections, that Longman would be vying for a non-traditional approach towards sexuality and marriage.

Longman treated these topics with academic care, as would be suggested by someone of his educational and professional background. While there were times when he seemed to be belabor the point (in my opinion), I think he did a sufficient job of covering his bases, laying out arguments for and against his case, and clearly giving his final analysis on these topics.

Readers may not hang on for all the depth that Longman gives them in this book. While he comes from the academic world and, at times, he dives fully into that in his writing and explanations, he does a good job not getting too overly academic and is still understandable by the average person.

Longman did not seem to have treated all four of these topics consistently. While there were some sections where he would bring in viewpoints of others, he did not always do that. While I would not say that this impacted his treatment of any of these topics, it would have been nice to have been given some names and viewpoints together rather than going through the bibliography and looking up books and authors individually.

“Confronting Old Testament Controversies” is worth the read. While it may not be for everyone, those who do read through it from front to back, regardless of whether they agree or not, should find themselves walking away having learned something along the way.

(This review is based upon a copy of this book which was provided free of charge from Baker Books. These opinions are my own; I was not required to write a positive review, nor was I compensated for this review.)

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The Logic of God – A Book Review

The Logic of GodRavi Zacharias has become fairly renowned for his apologetic work. I would be surprised for anyone who followed him through his speaking or writing to suggest that he comes across as arrogant or simplistic. He is thoughtful and courteous, using logic to explain his own rationale for belief in God.

It makes perfect sense then that this apologist would write a book entitled “The Logic of God.” Belief in God, Zacharias claims in the introduction, “offers the most coherent and logical answers to life’s four essential questions – origin, meaning, morality, and destiny.” With this claim in mind, Zacharias set about to write a book that would encourage Christians to build up their worldview.

I appreciate Zacharias’ words when he says that, “apologetics is often first seen before it is heard.” We live out our worldview and our faith before we are ever given the opportunity or permission from someone to explain why we believe what we believe. In today’s culture, where everything and anything goes, Zacharias reminds his readers that, “Truth by definition is exclusive. Everything cannot be true. If everything is true, then nothing is false.”

“The Logic of God,” like other works of Zacharias, is well-written. His thoughtfulness comes through in his writing as it does when one listens to him speak. This book is organized into fifty-two chapter, one for every week of the year. Each chapter begins with a Bible verse or passage, followed by narrative written by Zacharias, and concluding with reflection questions and personal application points. This allows the reader to read and reflect on a chapter per week, should they so desire.

The subtitle of the book is, “52 Christian essentials for the heart and mind.” As I read through the book, I appreciated everything that I read, but it was hard for me to see a cohesion between all the chapters. The information was encouraging and helpful by itself. The book is hardcover bound with a fabric bookmark sewn into the binding for the reader. So, it seems this book is really meant to be a gift book or coffee table book.

While I would have liked the chapters to flow better together, I don’t think that was Zacharias’ intention with the book. It serves as a book that can be left on the table, in the living room, at your bedside, in the bathroom, or wherever you read the most. The reader can pick it up whenever and wherever they want, easily reading through the short chapters one at a time.

With that in mind, this book succeeds for what it is, a devotional read for encouragement and uplifting.

(This review is based upon a copy of this book which was provided free of charge from Booklook Bloggers. These opinions are my own; I was not required to write a positive review, nor was I compensated for this review.)

Brave Surrender – A Book Review

brave surrenderIt seems that when God wants to use someone in a mighty way, there is a certain amount of difficulty and pain that they need to walk through in order to be ready and formed. Kind of a like a diamond, the pressures and stress inflicted will result in beauty, people can be shaped and formed into a tool and vessel for God. Kim Walker-Smith is a perfect example of this.

In her book “Brave Surrender,” which is more of a memoir and recounting of her early life up to the present, Walker-Smith honestly and candidly tells her story. She starts with what she is most well known for, her rendition of “How He Loves”  with Jesus Culture, and moves through the difficulties she faced growing up. Her father’s motorcycle accident which led to a severe brain injury and eventual divorce of her parents. Stepfathers who abused her, physically and mentally. A struggle with who she was and who God was calling her to be.

Throughout the book, Walker-Smith’s tendency towards the charismatic is evident. She refers to the Holy Spirit as Holy Spirit because putting “the” in front of him makes her relationship with him seem so impersonal. But it’s evident that she has a strong relationship with the Holy Spirit, constantly seeking to be in tune to his leading and movement in her life.

Walker-Smith writes with candor and openness. She lays all of her past out there on the pages knowing that God has shaped and formed her through all of these difficulties. She isn’t afraid to reveal it because she’s confident that God can use it to help others in their own journey.

“Brave Surrender” accounts Kim’s story and really gives the reader a glimpse into who she has become through all that she has been through. As she writes, she speaks of the growth points in her life, her need to worry less about pleasing others, her need to surrender to God’s leading in the midst of fear, anxiety, and depression.

Walker-Smith’s story is an experiential recounting of God’s work in her life. It is an encouragement to those whose journeys have been difficult, an encouragement to know that God can even use them. If your journey has been a difficult one and you are wondering how God might still be able to use you, “Brave Surrender” may bring the God-given hope that you are looking for.

(This review is based upon a copy of this book which was provided free of charge from Booklook Bloggers. These opinions are my own; I was not required to write a positive review, nor was I compensated for this review.)

Between Belief and Unbelief

When Faith FailsIf you’ve spent any time in the church, you may have grown uncomfortable with certain things that you see there. Aside from certain social issues that have emerged to the forefront in the recent past, there are other things that have irked people who find themselves struggling to make sense of what they know of God, what they read in the Bible, and what they experience in their daily lives. The juxtaposition of those three things is rarely as well-fitting as puzzle pieces but might rather feel more like the jagged edges of glass or pottery that were shattered and are now trying to be mended and put back together again.

Dominic Done steps into a difficult and sometimes controversial topic in his book “When Faith Fails.” He addresses doubt, a subject which has been avoided in some camps and embraced in others. Rather than taking the approach that it is bad, wrong, or sinful, Done instead recognizes it for what it is, “an opportunity for authentic and vibrant faith.”

Done divides the book into three sections: Far From Home, Exploring the Terrain, and Coming Home. Far From Home addresses how we got here to this point of doubt, wrestling with our faith. Exploring the Terrain seeks to find hope in life’s hardest questions. Coming Home deals with moving through doubt in pursuit of deep faith.

In the Far From Home section, Done is quick to correct those who may want to live or expect to live with complete and total certainty. He says that in seeking total certainty, we lose the beauty of mystery. As he puts it, “If all we value is explanation, we lose the joy of exploration.” He spends the section vying for a healthy doubt and trying to promote is as normal and an everyday part of life.

Doubt, as Done sees it, is living in the world in between belief and unbelief. It is a moment of tension, living somewhere in between. It is the place that stands in stark contrast to the Lego gospel which says that everything is awesome, because life is hard, tragic, and people sometimes suffer. It is the place you come to when everything you thought was supporting you and holding you up disintegrates.

As “When Faith Fails” unfolds in these pages, Done shares insights and wisdom, but he does it with care, compassion, and sensitivity. There are plenty of helpful phrases that he shares, none of which felt contrived or cliche to me. For instance, “God doesn’t demand that we understand him, but he does ask that we trust him.” And, “You can believe without doubting, but you can’t doubt without believing.”

The Exploring the Terrain section contains an apologetic for the Bible. Can we trust it? As he walks through this section, he helpfully tells the reader that we might need to change our approach and view of the Bible. Rather than looking at it through modern or postmodern eyes, Done suggests we see it for what it is, “an eccentric, weird, difficult, challenging, inspiring, inviting, paradigm-disrupting book that, page by page, story by story, culminates in the person of Jesus.”

Done also asks in this section whether science is the enemy of faith. As he sees it, faith and science are not enemies, but different sides to the same picture. He writes, “Science only tells us part of the story. It reveals and enriches our perception of reality; opening our eyes to the complexity and splendor of the world. But it cannot tell us why it takes our breath away.”

While many in the world of religion see science as the enemy and many in the field of science see religion as incompatible with science, there are others who live in the tension of both, scientists who are theologians and who embrace both sides.

Theodicy, the problem of pain and suffering, and the silence of God are also addressed by Done. He doesn’t throw trite answers at any of the questions he poses. He also doesn’t give packaged responses that fail to address what is at the heart of these questions and issues. If I could describe the approach in one way, it would be embracing the tension of the in between. So, if you are seeking a beautiful resolution like a thirty minute sitcom, you should probably go somewhere else.

As Done moves into the third and final section, one of the most memorable recommendations that he makes to the reader is to, “do the hard work to put yourself in a place where the truth can find you.” He recommends seeking out community because it is in community that we are shaped, formed, and that we learn. Rather than seeing community as a provider of resources to be consumed, we should see it as a family to invest in. Even as we look at Scripture, Done says, we should see it as active participation in the unfolding of a story that tells us we are all in this together. The community of the church is the place where broken people should discover that they are not alone.

Done does a great job of encouraging his readers to embrace doubt with purpose and intent. While some doubt dogmatically challenging anyone to prove those doubts false, Done recommends an approach that seeks to learn and understand, not completely, but adequately.

I have encountered a number of people within the church over the years who have been so adamantly against doubt that you would think they were afraid of the outcome had they embraced it. I wish that I had encountered a book like “When Faith Fails” a long time ago, I would have felt less awkward and much more affirmed when I found myself in that in between world.

The approach that Done recommends with doubt is very much the approach that is modeled by David in the Psalms. He started with his honest doubts, questions, and concerns, but he always came back to God, who he was, what he had done, and what he had promised to do in the future.

If you have wrestled with doubts and questions, this book won’t give you quick and easy answers, but it will help you to know that you are not alone nor is there something wrong with you. Instead, Done brings encouragement to his readers to embrace the tension and continue on the journey with expectation, anticipation, and mystery. If you can live with the tension, then “When Faith Fails” may just be the book to help encourage you through it.

(This review is based upon a copy of this book which was provided free of charge from Booklook Bloggers. These opinions are my own; I was not required to write a positive review, nor was I compensated for this review.)

Parents as growing guides

Growing WithI have sat back and observed the helicopter parents that seem to be so prevalent within our society. I’ve witnessed those parents who seem to be living vicariously through their children’s experiences. I’ve wondered whether the children who are on the courts and fields alongside my own children are there because they legitimately have a love and desire to play a sport or because their parents are banking on their kids securing an athletic scholarship in the no too distant future.

There is no doubt that parenting isn’t for cowards. There is no doubt that there are parents out there who have no concept of their own growth and transformation alongside their children on the journey. But if we embrace a faith in Christ and truly seek to be changed and transformed on this journey, we should also be seeking to be transformed in places where we may somehow think we’ve arrived, that includes parenting.

“As parents and caring adults, we often feel the gap between us and our kids widening as they become teenagers and young adults. Maybe it’s just that they’re growing up. But we fear the gap is also a symptom that we’re growing apart.” So write Kara Powell and Steve Argue as they begin their latest book “Growing With.”

Powell and Argue say that Growing With parenting is an attempt to close this growing gap between parents and their maturing children. Growing With parenting is an attempt to seek transformation not only for our children, but for ourselves as well. As maturity seems to be trending older now, meaning that children are arriving at certain life experiences later than their parents, there is a need for parents to understand this, learn from it, and seek ways to help rather than hinder their children on those journeys.

With this in mind, Powell and Argue suggest three dynamic verbs by which parents can best help their children and themselves as they move through this journey: withing, faithing, and adulting. It is around these three verbs that “Growing With” is written.

There is a constant tendency to want our children to experience things similarly to us, but we have to understand that the world is different. We need to hold on more loosely to our own ideals and dreams and allow our children to develop and mature in a path that may look vastly different from our own. As the authors write, “Growing alongside our withing, faithing, and adulting kids requires holding our future snapshots loosely, because our dreams may not end up being theirs.”

Powell and Argue, through their research, lay out guidelines by which parents can best facilitate their children’s growth through these three phases of withing, faithing, and adulting. They helpfully identify the various stages along the journey by labeling both children and parents. Children move from learners to explorers to focusers while their parents move from teachers to guides to resources. Because everyone is different, there is an overlap in all of these stages as children are transitioning from learners to explorers to focusers. Just as children transition through these stages, so do parents transition and there is overlap through their stages of teachers to guides to resources as well.

Just as there is awkwardness and uncertainty for our children as they move through these stages, so is there awkwardness and uncertainty in our own transition through the stages of parenting. We will not always get it right, we are not perfect, we will fail. Powell and Argue are not ashamed to share their insights which have come from both successfully navigating those transitions as well as unsuccessfully navigating. There are plenty of insights that come from the learnings that have been gained from failures and mistakes. I appreciate the humility and candidness with which the authors come, sharing their own imperfections to encourage the rest of us that even the “experts” don’t always get it right.

The authors use a helpful diagram which lays out a picture of the journey through all three stages of withing, faithing, and adulting as children move from learners to explorers to focusers and as parents complete their own journey as teachers to guides to resources. The inclusion of this diagram throughout the book is a helpful reminder to the reader of what the journey may look like and just how fluid these processes become.

Humility and grace are required for this journey. Growing With parenting cannot be achieved by parents who are seeking only for their kids to avoid certain things or for parents who simply believe that filling their children with Jesus when they’re young will somehow propel them forward and fill them up for the rest of their lives. Growing With parenting seeks for faith to be more than a noun. Faith is also a verb.

There are so many insights within this book, more than a short review allows me to share. Having read Kara’s book “Sticky Faith” years ago and also having been privileged to have been part of Sticky Faith cohort through the Fuller Youth Institute, the principles which are laid out and shared in “Sticky Faith” and also in Kara and Steve’s book “Growing Young” are cumulative, the build on one another. While reading these other books isn’t a requirement to read “Growing With,” it is helpful to be familiar with the concept which the authors lay out.

Part of the Growing With journey for parents is about allowing your children to make mistakes and learn from those mistakes. It’s also about giving children the space to make decisions that don’t always align with your own values. The authors share insights into the most effective ways to do this and, through their own research, share the statistics and rates of success. Not surprisingly, some of the methods that may have been labeled as “tried and true” in the past are proven, through research, to not be nearly as effective as they once were thought to be.

Powell and Argue do their best to tackle as broad of a spectrum of experiences as possible in “Growing With.” They share insights about identity issues that emerging adults may be struggling through, particularly in the area of LGBTQ. While this might cause some readers to squirm, I appreciate the authors’ sensitivity and understanding that this is not an issue to be swept under the rug, but rather one to hold and acknowledge, regardless of where you stand on the specifics of this identity and the Bible.

Having not only read their books but having also sat under their teaching, I can honestly say that Kara and Steve offer parents the triple threat of information. They have been educated in this area, they have done extensive research in this area, and they have the experience of being parents themselves of emerging adults who have been on this journey. The insights and wisdom that they offer doesn’t come from some ivory tower of academia but it is seasoned with the scars and lumps that have been gained from knowing firsthand what this all feels like.

If I have any criticism of this book, it’s that there are times in “Growing With” that some of the statistics and additional information presented can feel burdensome. But admittedly, I am a bottom line person who can too easily become entangled with peripherals, so I appreciate a straightforward presentation of material. I often feel the need to read every sidebar, note, and insight within a book. I don’t imagine that the authors expect that same approach from every reader, but they also know that there will inevitably be those readers who want this additional information so that they can journey down the rabbit hole towards a better understanding of the conclusions reached in this book.

For readers who are longing to see not only the growth and development of their children but also their own growth and development, “Growing With” is a must read book. Nowhere along the way will the reader feel as if they are being lectured or talked down to, instead, they should feel as if they are being the gift of two humble and loving guides who are seeking to help others navigate and negotiate the difficult journey of parenting in the 21st century.

I highly recommend this book, not only to be read once, but to be kept on your shelf for constant reference as you navigate the rough waters of parenting. I also recommend that anyone who is part of a local church, whether in leadership or not, read this book as well. Based on what we read in Scripture, the task of parenting should not be limited to those who are biologically or legally responsible for their children. If we truly care about the growth and transformation of Christ’s church in this world, then we should also be considering how we are investing in her next generation.

(This review is based upon a copy of this book which was provided free of charge from Baker Books. These opinions are my own; I was not required to write a positive review, nor was I compensated for this review.)

Irresistible Faith – A Book Review

irresistible faithMany people are familiar with the quote attributed to Gandhi that, “I like your Jesus but I don’t like your Christians.” For centuries, it seems that one of the greatest apologetics against Christianity has been the body of Christ, who have misrepresented him and, “created a public relationship nightmare for the movement that he began through his death, burial, and resurrection.”

Into this, Scott Sauls brings his latest book, “Irresistible Faith.” Sauls is calling the body of Christ to be a better representation of who we are called to be in this world. If we begin to live in such a way that our faith is irresistible, perhaps the apologetic might turn around and instead of dissuading people from Christianity, they might see something in us so compelling that it will be irresistible.

Sauls splits the book into three parts: abiding in the Irresistible Christ, belonging to an irresistible community, and becoming an irresistible Christian. He calls Christians to seek out ways to distinguish themselves from the world in which we live. His call isn’t to completely sequester ourselves or hole ourselves up and practicing avoidance at all costs. Sauls points us to a place of savoring Christ rather than the things that the world has to offer.

He isn’t condemning the things of the world, he is simply condemning the loving and savoring them over Christ. He writes, “Possessing what the world has to offer only become problematic when possessing what the world has to offer starts to possess us.” Saul uses the example of Gollum from the Lord of the Rings books, a creature who had once been a simple Hobbit but who had been overcome with a lust for his “precious” that turned him into something like Hobbit-like.

Sauls also calls his readers to belong to an irresistible community. This has been a problem for many people as their experience of the church, the body of Christ, has been less than desirable. Rather than experiencing a place of welcome, warmth, and love, they have experienced a place of judgment, backbiting, and abandonment.

But we were created for community, Sauls writes, “not for isolation; for interdependence, not for autonomy; for relational warmth and receptivity, not for relational coldness and distance.” When God created Adam, he knew that it was not good for him to be alone. We also see that the community that existed from eternity past within the three persons of the Trinity has been extended outwards to those whom God has created in his own image.

There is acknowledgment of the imperfections of the church, but Sauls casts vision of what the church could be. “If all our Christian communities and churches were sold out to this one simple practice – to only speak words that make souls stronger – I wonder how many spiritually disengaged people would start wanting to engage. I wonder how many religious skeptics would want to start investigating Christianity instead of keeping their distance from its claims and its followers.” That kind of community would be compelling and irresistible to those who can encounter the opposite over and over again within the world.

Being in community means opening ourselves up to accountability and confrontation. Those things need to be done with loving intentions and humility. We are all imperfect, but that shouldn’t stop us from calling each other out with the right intentions. We should treat each others, “as fellow sinners who are on a journey right alongside us. We move together toward perfection, being animated by God who is faithful to complete the work that he began in us.”

Lesslie Newbigin once wrote that movements towards the new creation that God is seeking to create can only happe, “when local congregations renounce an introverted concern for their own life, and recognize that they exist for the sake of those who are not members, as a sign, instrument, and foretaste of God’s redeeming grace for the whole life of society.” This is the beginning of Saul’s third section of the book, how we become irresistible Christians.

We move towards becoming irresistible Christians as we treasure the poor, as we embrace our work, and as we leave things better than we have found them. Sauls is calling his readers to the work of biblical justice, being about the things that God is about. He doesn’t mince words, telling Christians that if the only faith people see is a doctrinal skeleton without the flesh and muscle that carry that doctrine out, then we have a malnourished faith which is sick or dead.

Sauls encourages a work ethic that makes no sacred and secular distinction. He is not promoting an ideology that only those who find themselves employed full-time in some kind of ministry position or organization are the only legitimate ministers. Instead, he calls Christians to the words of the Apostle Paul who said that we should do everything, no matter what it is, as if we are doing it unto the Lord.

Finally, rather than embracing a twisted and distorted theology that “it’s all gonna burn up anyway,” Sauls encourages Christians to leave things better than they have found them. While many have claimed that we can attain perfection and create a better world apart from Christ, Sauls says that the only way that we can achieve this is through the power of God. He casts a vision for what could be if Christians were to live differently.

“Irresistible Faith” is a call to action. Sauls is not simply suggesting that right theology will get us to a place where we are on track to better represent Christ. He is calling Christians to let their theology be evident in what they do, what they say, and how they act in this world. He is really calling Christians to step up to be who we are supposed to be rather than who we have become.

If you want to be challenged and called to action, then you will appreciate Saul’s work here. If you want to continue to live a life that seems no different than those around you who have no faith to speak of, then this book is probably one to avoid. If we heed the call that Sauls puts out here, I think we could see a real “turning of the ship” when it comes to how the world sees and perceives the body of Christ who is supposed to be representing him in this world.

(This review is based upon a copy of this book which was provided free of charge from Booklook Bloggers. These opinions are my own; I was not required to write a positive review, nor was I compensated for this review.)

The New You – A Book Review

The New YouAccording to Nelson Searcy and Jennifer Henson, “Too many people filling American churches each weekend aren’t able to experience life to the fullest because they are struggling with their physical bodies, their minds and emotions, and their daily relationships with God.” And so the duo introduces their premise in their latest book, “The New You.”

Christians are called to care for themselves, not just physically, but emotionally, spiritually, and mentally as well. We cannot continue to make excuses as to why there is no need to care for ourselves in these areas, we need to pursue health in these areas to be good stewards of what God had given us.

Searcy and Henson take their readers through these four areas, but before they do, they remind them that this process is not one of overnight success. It is a process and they recommend three steps: surrender your health to God, stop making excuses, and start making small steps to change. When you “fall off the wagon,” make course corrections and start again. Give yourself grace and keep pressing on. They remind their readers that, “quick fixes always lead to short-term results, followed by a face plant right back into the condition we were in before we started.”

Each chapter concludes with a section called, “Small Steps to the New You,” which contains simple steps to help the reader move towards a new and healthy lifestyle. The writers share their own experiences, both successes and failures, as they encourage the reader towards a healthy lifestyle.

The message of this book is a necessary. For far too long, Christians have pointed to pet sins to decry while dismissing their own lack of stewardship in the area of health, physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual health. This book is a call for Christians to see the need for the stewardship of their bodies and to realize that the lack of care for themselves is simply irresponsible.

While the message of this book was not new to me, Searcy and Henson’s connection of health to stewardship may be revelatory to some. They approach their subject with grace and freedom, not legalistically. If you are struggling to move towards a more healthy lifestyle, this book may be a step in the right direction.

(This review is based upon a copy of this book which was provided free of charge from Baker Books. These opinions are my own; I was not required to write a positive review, nor was I compensated for this review.)

 

Basics for Believers – A Book Review

basics for believersPhilippians is a fairly short and concise book. Yet in the four chapters of this book, Paul outlines much of what the basic Christian life is or should be about. In “Basics for Believers,” D.A. Carson takes a deeper look.

Carson distills the message of Philippians down into four key ideas that Paul emphasizes: put the gospel first, adopt Jesus’ death as a test of your outlook, emulate worthy Christian leaders, and never give up the Christian walk. Those are the chapters that Carson divides this book into as he walks the reader through Philippians.

Carson doesn’t dive into the  original languages or spend a lot of time academically expounding upon the text of Philippians. Instead, he takes a very practical approach towards this Pauline letter. He doesn’t get caught up using deep theological language but writes in a simple and understandable way.

The subtitle of this book is, “The core of Christian faith and life – A Study of Philippians.” For readers wanting to study Paul’s letter deeper than a simple reading of the text, this book would be helpful. It’s a good starting point but will most likely not satisfy the more academic readers who want a more in depth study.

Ultimately, Carson’s words regarding the last chapter of Philippians give a good synopsis of the book overall. Carson writes that this last chapter emphasizes, “integrity in relationships, fidelity toward God, quiet confidence in him, purity and wholesomeness in thought, and godliness in heart attitude.” Those are the basics that Carson believes Paul conveys to his early readers and the basics that Carson emphasizes to his readers as well.

(This review is based upon a copy of this book which was provided free of charge from Baker Books. These opinions are my own; I was not required to write a positive review, nor was I compensated for this review.)

The Wondering Years – A Book Review

The Wondering YearsWhen you’ve spent a good deal of your life absorbing pop culture, it only makes sense that you would filter everything else in your life, including spirituality, through the lens of pop culture. That’s just what Knock McCoy did, as he grew up and began to come to grips with spirituality and with his own Christianity, he took lessons that he had learned from all the pop culture he had been exposed to and used them to try to make sense of things.

McCoy plays to his strengths in “The Wondering Years.” He is a writer and screenwriter and he lets his own sense of humor bleed through. He also uses his gift for screenwriting to bring humor to certain chapters, inserting screenplay excerpts pertaining to the crisis he is describing at the moment in the chapter.

No topic seems to be off limits for McCoy and he isn’t afraid to throw himself under the bus, over and over again. Punches in the face as a child. Admissions testing for a private school. High school athletics. Getting married young. McCoy hits as many topics as he can and through it all, he weaves his way through the various pop culture icons he encountered on his way to growing up.

Reading through the pages of “The Wondering Years” is like watching an old 8MM home movie. There’s a bit of nostalgia, some awkward memories that might rear their ugly heads, and a whole lot of smiling. It’s not a book that I would read over and over again.

McCoy is a gifted and humorous writer. As an introduction to him, this book made me want to explore other things that he has written. If nothing else, this book is entertaining. It isn’t replete with deep theological nuggets or biblical references, but I doubt anyone came looking for that here, and if they did, they’ll be disappointed.

(This review is based upon a copy of this book which was provided free of charge from Booklook Bloggers. These opinions are my own; I was not required to write a positive review, nor was I compensated for this review.)

Reaching the Unreachable?

The Passion GenerationThe Christian church can get obsessed about things. Sometimes it’s a particular sin, other times it’s a particular trend, still other times it’s a particular group or subset of people.

Over the past few years, one of the subsets of people that the church has been most concerned and obsessed with is Millenials. If you’ve hung around churches at all, you’ve probably heard the statistics of how many of these Millenials are dropping out of church once they get to college. Books have been written. Studies have been done. Sermons have been preached. But what’s the answer in how to engage Millenials to get them back into the church?

Enter Grant Skeldon, a Millenial himself. Skeldon has written “The Passion Generation – The Seemingly Reckless, Definitely Disruptive, But Far From Hopeless Millenials.”

Now, I hate it when people talk things up so much that when you finally experience it for yourself, you are extremely disappointed as you find out that something has been oversold to you. At the risk of overselling “The Passion Generation,” I have to say that this book was one of the best books that I have read this year. The clarifier of that statement is that I have read more than sixty books this year, so I think that my opinion matters.

When it comes to Millenials, Skeldon seems wise beyond his years. This wisdom, he claims, has come from the countless mentors whom he has had pouring into him.

Skeldon is not afraid to admit some of the faults of his generation. At the same time, he isn’t afraid to point to those who are older who have caused some of the reactions that we see among Millenials. He speaks truthfully and honestly here, and if those of us who are older are really honest, it gets a little uncomfortable at times. For instance, he poses the question of why the most cause-oriented generation in the world (Millenials) are neglecting the most cause-oriented organization in the world (the church).

The primary means by which Skeldon believes the generation gap can be bridged is through discipleship. Discipleship has become a buzzword of late within the church, but the discipleship of which he speaks is not what most churches have embraced as discipleship. When he says discipleship, he doesn’t mean sitting down one on one with someone and going through a book together. Instead, he means discipleship like Jesus did: spending time investing in people and living life together.

Skeldon believes that Millenials are avoiding the church not because the church is asking too much of them, but rather because the church is asking too little of them. Their fear of commitment is outweighed, he says, by their fear of missing out.

All that being said, Skeldon splits the book into two parts: Discipling Millenials and What Millenials Look For In A Church. He has good practical information in here, but he never claims to have a quick fix. In fact, there isn’t a quick fix. The process of discipleship, regardless of age, is a commitment that’s about relationships which take time.

At the end of each chapter, there are visual representations of some of the key points highlighted within the chapter. For the visual learners among us, this is very helpful. It emphasizes the things that Skeldon sees as most important.

As I read this book, I found myself agreeing with so much of what Skeldon had written. My own experience with Millenials has shown me that much of what he writes in here is true. Many in this generation that has been given a bad rap have not materialized out of thin air the way that they are. Instead, they’ve been discipled to act the way they do, maybe not so much intentionally, but unintentionally.

When I was growing up, my parents had a little plaque on the wall of my room. On that plaque was written a poem called “Children Live What They Learn.” The premise was that the things that children learn by watching, they will do for themselves when the time comes.

I think we are seeing a generation that has learned not what we’ve wanted them to learn, but what we have shown them, and what we’ve shown them hasn’t been the best. So there is a dual ownership here that led to this problem and there will need to be a dual ownership of said problem to move us away from it.

If you are a leader in the church or you simply have a heart for the next generation, I would highly recommend “The Passion Generation” to you. It’s a practical resource full of wisdom, insight, and advice that, if heeded, could go along way in engaging a generation that has been unfairly judged.

(This review is based upon a copy of this book which was provided free of charge from Booklook Bloggers. These opinions are my own; I was not required to write a positive review, nor was I compensated for this review.)