Faith Among the Faithless – A Book Review

faith among the faithlessOne of the most difficult things that I have found when reading the Bible is remembering to look at the contents based on context of both writers and readers (or hearers). I often find myself jumping right to how what I read applies to me today rather than processing just how the original readers received it. When I do this, I miss some significant pieces of the story and, frankly, it’s a fairly self-consumed and overall selfish reading without gaining the benefits of exploring context.

Mike Cosper’s book “Faith Along the Faithless” takes the ancient story of Esther and connects it to the world we now live in. He retells the story and fills in some of the details that might be missed on a perfunctory reading. In looking at this ancient story, Cosper sees many lessons that modern day Christians can learn and apply to their own lives.

Cosper tells the reader that this modern, secular age has had a profound impact on the church. As he moves through the story, he reminds the reader that this story is much less like Veggie Tales or the flannelgraph Sunday school versions of Esther that we may have heard and is much more like Game of Thrones. Deception. Betrayal. Conspiracy. Murder.

Esther was not the squeaky clean poster child that Sunday school teachers have sometimes portrayed. Esther and Mordecai were Jews living in Babylon. They’ve been assimilated and it’s become hard to tell the difference between Jews and Babylonians, very similar to our current situation.

Cosper intertwines his retelling of this story amidst his own thoughts and commentary. He makes references to the portions of the Book of Esther to which he is referring. This is a helpful reference for the reader who wants to be more thorough in looking at the biblical account while reading Cosper’s retelling.

My interest in this book was more about Cosper’s digging deeper into the story than it was seeing the comparisons to modern day. His overall connection to the exilic story of the Bible was good, I didn’t feel like he was trying to take the story and overlay the lessons that he was hoping or trying to teach. He gave the lessons in context and then made the leap to apply them today.

I appreciate good storytellers who are able to accentuate with added detail when they tell stories. Cosper does that well here with the story of Esther. I appreciated this book and even think that I may go back and refer to it in any future dealings with Esther or even reread it as a reminder. It’s a worthwhile read and the lessons that Cosper takes from the story of Esther and applies to today are definitely worth considering.

(This review is based upon a copy of this book which was provided free of charge from Booklook Bloggers. These opinions are my own; I was not required to write a positive review, nor was I compensated for this review.)

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