Christian Leadership and the Cross

cross and christian ministryThe subtitle of D.A. Carson’s book, “The Cross and Christian Ministry” is “Leadership Lessons From 1 Corinthians.” Carson takes a substantial amount of time in the beginning of the book to emphasize (maybe even overemphasize) the difference between the wisdom of God and the wisdom of the world.  Paul’s words in 1 Corinthians are, “For the foolishness of God is wiser than man’s wisdom, and the weakness of God is stronger than man’s strength.”

Carson’s emphasis on God’s wisdom and the cross of Christ sets the tone for the entire book, especially as it relates to leadership. After all, when leaders within the church overemphasize their own wisdom versus the wisdom of God, the situation within the church can increasingly look like the world.

This book should not be seen as an exhaustive commentary on Paul’s first letter to the Corinthians. Instead, Carson focuses on a good portion of chapters 1 and 2 as well as chapter 3, 4, and a portion of chapter 9 as well. Remembering the focus here is on Christian ministry and leadership, herein is where Caron’s emphasis lies.

Although there is a great distance both temporally and culturally between the Western church and the context to which Paul was writing, the lessons are no less applicable to us. The church is not a place for celebrities, Carson says, especially not in the pulpit. We are constantly looking back to the cross, remembering that worldly wisdom pales in comparison to the wisdom of God. Relying on our own wisdom will surely lead to our own lauding and may even lead to us forgetting just where any of our wisdom comes from to begin with.

Carson gets his point across regarding the centrality of the cross and the wisdom of God. How he gets that point across may not necessarily be as engaging for some as they would like. At a little over one hundred and fifty pages, this book was not lengthy, but it was not a quick and fast read. There were multiple times that I felt as if Carson was belaboring his points, beating a dead horse even, not trusting that he had gotten his point across the first time around.

If you choose to dive into this book, be patient with yourself and with Carson. There are choice morsels within here that you can find, it just may require more patience and digging than you may be accustomed to.

(This review is based upon a copy of this book which was provided free of charge from Baker Books. These opinions are my own; I was not required to write a positive review, nor was I compensated for this review.)

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