I Can Only Imagine – The Story Behind the Song

i can only imagineYou may be familiar with the hit song “I Can Only Imagine,” but you probably don’t know the history and background of the song and the story behind it. In “I Can Only Imagine” Bart Millard tells his story along with the story behind the song. Really, his story IS the story behind the song as Millard tells of the difficulties that he had growing up.

Throughout Millard’s recounting of his story, he describes some of the details of his early life and just how MercyMe became a band. Millard tells of his dual ankle injury while playing football that led to him quitting football and joining the choir. Eventually, he even starred as Curly in “Oklahoma.”

Much of Millard’s story focuses on his relationship with his father and the pain and abuse that he suffered at his father’s hand. After being hit by a car while directing traffic on a construction site led to a frontal lobe injury in his father’s brain, his father was never the same. His parents eventually divorced and Bart was left to live with his father. Even though Millard had an older brother, his father somehow seemed to have targeted him with the verbal and physical abuse that he doled out.

While in the 9th grade, Millard’s father was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. Knowing that it was terminal resulted in a dramatic change in his attitude and behavior. As his father faced his own mortality, he began to become more like the man that had existed before his accident. The abuse stopped and he began to really embrace the faith that he had only outwardly professed. This began a relationship and friendship between Bart and his father that had not existed before.

As his father’s health continued to deteriorate, their relationship grew deeper and stronger. When his father finally passed away, Millard talks of just how much God had done to restore the relationship that had been so frail and volatile.

Along the way, as Millard describes everything that happened between him and his father, he also tells of how he and his wife, who he’d known since they were young, kept coming back to each other. Eventually, they realized that there was a reason for that and they broke off the relationships that they had with other people to embrace what had been right in front of them all along.

Millard also tells of how he wrote “I Can Only Imagine” in a matter of minutes and how the music came to be at the end of a recording session which had all but been wrapped up. And in the miracle of this short span of time came about a song whose span and influence exceeded any other song before it.

The story of the song, the band, and this father-son relationship engrossed me. Having lost my own mother to pancreatic cancer, I was gripped from the very beginning. I could relate to Millard’s story in some ways and not in others, but his telling of the story was powerful and moving, drawing me in and keeping me reading page after page as the story unfolded.

“I Can Only Imagine” had always been such a powerful song to me, now having read the story behind the song and the songwriter, an already powerful song somehow became more so. Regardless of where you stand in terms of faith, it would be hard to read this account without being moved in some way. I urge you to pick up a copy of this book and dive into this story. You won’t be disappointed and it may just be an encouragement and a jolt to your faith to read of how God’s hand worked in the life of Bart Millard.

(This review is based upon a copy of this book which was provided free of charge from Booklook Bloggers. These opinions are my own; I was not required to write a positive review, nor was I compensated for this review.)

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