Wounds Are Where Light Enters – A Book Review

Wounds Are Where Light EntersWalter Wangerin’s newest book “Wounds Are Where Light Enters” contains personal stories. He shares stories about his family, his childhood, his ministry, and so much more. Wangerin seems to be an artist as much as a writer. Of course, some don’t see the two as mutually exclusive anyway, but Wangerin tells his stories with inspiration and appeal.

This book is full of stories that run the gamut. Some will warm your heart and others will break your heart. Wangerin writes of a widower who has holed himself in his house with little to no contact to the outside world. He writes of his experience as a pastor in an urban setting where a self-appointed neighborhood watch dog questioned him, “Why you walkin’ my streets?” Wangerin had to convince the watch dog that he was indeed a pastor of the church down the street.

Wangerin tells the story of Diane who was sexually abused by her father. It’s one of the stories in this book that kept me riveted and broke my heart at the same time. Wangerin has a way of drawing his reader in, making them part of the story as he tells it from his vantage point. His ability to translate emotion and communicate in a way that connects and moves his read is impressive.

He tells the story of Junie Piper whom he visits in prison. After numerous visits where it doesn’t seem as if Wangerin is getting through to him, he receives a collect phone call. On the other end of that phone call is Piper who simply says, “I love you” to Wangerin. After hanging up the phone, Wangerin wept and knew that he had encountered Jesus in that man.

If someone were to ask me what this book was about or how to categorize it, I would have a hard time. Wisdom literature is probably what I would say, my best descriptor. But it felt like so much more than that. It was inspiration. It was wisdom. It was conviction. It was preaching. It was evangelizing. It was all of these things and more, in the best way possible.

Wangerin doesn’t convey a distorted image of himself, only showing the good. He is honest and transparent, even about his faults and mistakes. Some of the stories he shares about his own parenting were, to me, among the most powerful in this book considering the stage of life in which I find myself. Knowing that others have gone before me and made similar mistakes to my own is a comfort.

While I had heard of Walter Wangerin, Jr. before, this was the first of his books that I read. I’ve had his books “The Book of God” and “The Book of the Dun Cow” for about a year. I expect that they will be moved to the top of my reading pile now that I’ve experienced him as a writer.

If you want inspiration and stories with heart, consider “Wounds Are Where Light Enters.”

(This review is based upon a copy of this book which was provided free of charge from Booklook Bloggers. These opinions are my own; I was not required to write a positive review, nor was I compensated for this review.)

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One thought on “Wounds Are Where Light Enters – A Book Review

  1. These are the books that I have. Ragman was what got me hooked. I used that entire book for my Young Life club talks. Religious books · Ragman and Other Cries of Faith (1984; 2004) · Miz Lil And The Chronicles Of Grace (1988) · Little Lamb, Who Made Thee? (1993; 2004) · Mourning into Dancing (1992) · Reliving the Passion (1992) · The Book of God: The Bible as a Novel (1996) · Orphean Passages (1996) · The Manger is Empty (1998) Fantasy novels · The Book of the Dun Cow (1978) · The Book of Sorrows (1985) I think my next one will be: · Letters from the Land of Cancer (2010)

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