What Is Reformed Theology? – A Book Review

what-is-reformed-theologyR.C. Sproul has become such a staple in the world of reformed theology that it’s hard to even think about the modern world of reformed theology without uttering his name. The seminary professor, pastor, and founder of Ligonier Ministries has written more than ninety books and can be heard regularly on the radio program Renewing Your Mind.

“What Is Reformed Theology?” is a primer on reformed theology. Whether you are new to reformed theology and want to have your questions answered or you are a veteran who simply wants to be sharpened and give yourself a refresher, this book is a valuable resource. While there are times that Sproul’s language and explanations may lose the casual reader, he doesn’t spend an awful lot of time lost in academic language. The subtitle of the book is “Understanding the Basics” and that’s what Sproul seeks to do, show the reader the basics of reformed theology.

The book is divided into two parts: The Foundations of Reformed Theology and Five Points of Reformed Theology. Both parts of the book are also divided into five parts. The first part points to the essentials and foundation of reformed theology, as Sproul describes them, the foundation stones on which reformed theology was built.

Sproul leads the reader through chapters on the God-centered aspect of reformed theology, on the centrality of Scripture, on the centrality of faith and justification to our salvation, to the supremacy of Jesus Christ as prophet, priest, and king, and the three covenants that are also central to reformed theology (giving it its nickname of covenant theology).

The second half walks through the five points of Calvinism. Sproul is quick to point out that these five points were not developed by Calvin himself but by his followers in response to the followers of Arminius. While Sproul shares the acronym TULIP for these five points, he also adds language which he finds more helpful, accurate, and reliable, again pointing out that the TULIP acronym was created reactively.

This second half of the book certainly labors along at times. It feels a little more exhaustive than the first. At times seeming as if Sproul is reiterating his point to a fault rather than simply moving on. Having met peers and colleagues who consider themselves three or four point Calvinists, I could see how this section of the book could give the reader more difficulties. But Sproul’s thorough explanations make for a good apologetic of the validity of reformed theology.

Overall, this is a very helpful book. Sproul has a way of explaining things in a more pedestrian way rather than being overly academic. This will be a helpful resource on my shelf when I need my own refresher on some of the specific explanations of reformed theology and the reformed tradition. While I am not sure that this will convince any skeptics to the validity of reformed theology, Sproul’s explanations will certainly help to reinforce those who have already embraced reformed theology as a way of seeing God and the world he created.

(This review is based upon a copy of this book which was provided free of charge from Baker Books. These opinions are my own; I was not required to write a positive review, nor was I compensated for this review.)

Advertisements

One thought on “What Is Reformed Theology? – A Book Review

  1. This sounds good, Jon. I’ll have to order it.

    Lowell

    Lowell Beach Sykes 4401 Montgomery Road Lynchburg, VA 24503 USA Telephone: 434 384 8957

    Please note: message attached

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s